Free Active Math Resource Library

As a teacher, I am always looking for new teaching ideas; however, I don’t have hours and hours to create lessons. We’ve created a collection of free active math activities that can be used with any math content level and are also quick (under 10 minutes) to create!  Access our library by clicking the image below.

 

Cut It Up: This activity is great for a station, warm-up or exit ticket.

Cut it Out

This is a flip book. There is a problem which students open to reveal the answer.

 

Lay It Out: Do you teach a math concept that follows a process? 

If you teach math, the answer to the above question is yes. Lay it out uses notecards to have students look for the pattern in the process. You write out each step on a note card and students place the process in order.

 

Are you feeling Lucky Game? This game could be used with any math concept/topic. Best is that it can be played with any worksheet or problem set from the book. Students solve problems, then place their group name on a number in a spreadsheet. Based on how many problems you think they will complete, you decide on which numbers to use in the spreadsheet.

Do you want directions/videos for the games on I am describing then click here.

 

Envelope Activity: Place students into groups of 3 or 4. Write a math problem on the outside of the envelope. Inside the envelope place paper or graphs for them to complete the problem. Students will take a paper out of the envelope, work out the problem and put their solution back in the envelope. They rotate their envelopes clockwise, take out a sheet of paper, solve the new problem and place their solution back in the envelope. They continue this process until they have their initial envelope back. Once they have their original envelope, they take out all of the papers and check everyone’s solution. If there are any that are different, they discuss the error as a group. This is great for error analysis and the math practice involving critiquing the reasoning of others.

 

Bucket of Lies: Solve math problems incorrectly, make copies of your work and place them into a bucket. Have students work in groups of 2-4. They will take out a problem, find the error and discuss how to correct it. This is an activity that you could do with every chapter. Use the errors you are seeing on formative assessments to help them prepare for their summative.

 

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mathland

Mathland

How to play mathland!  If you like this activity, please join our mailing list for an activity like this sent to you once a week, click here. 

Teacher Directions: 

  • Take colored pieces of paper and lay them around your classroom. I used red, yellow, blue, green, orange and yellow and this is the order I laid them out. Choose a pattern and keep it throughout the room.
    • Teaching Note:  I had different pathways but it was confusing to students. I changed my papers to only travel one path in my classroom.

mathland

  • On white pieces of paper, have the four math operations (plus, minus, times, and divide).
    • Teaching Note: You only need one copy of each. Spread these out amongst the colored sheets.
  • On the first paper, write start. On the last paper, write finish.
  • Deck of cards, You need to have the four operation symbols + colors of paper on the ground in the card deck for the game.
    • Teaching Note: I used the google documents playing card template to make my deck.
  • To mark the game board, use things already in your room. (stapler, tape, pencil, cups, etc.) Teaching Note: You need enough for each group to have one.
  • Place students into groups of 3-4.
  • Give students a problem set. You could share a Google Document with them, give them a worksheet, assign them problems from their book, hang problems on the wall, etc.)

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Student Directions: 
  • Solve a problem.
  • Check it with your teacher.
  • Draw a card from the deck and move the appropriate amount of spaces.
  • Repeat previous steps until you finish.

Gain access to activities that work for any math level/ content

 

sing it, songs to teach math

Sing It – Using Songs to Teach math

Gain access to a collection of activities that work for any math content/level

Gain access to game/activities that work for any math content.

Check out my good-bye song. I will be performing for each of my classes. Warning before you watch, I CAN’T SING!

 

 

I created a mash-up of songs to say good-bye to my students.

I’ve used songs throughout the year:

  • When I taught domain and range from a number line, we sang to Beyonce’s Irreplaceable. This really helped understand negative versus positive infinity. We sang, “To the right, to the right, positive infinity is off to the right or To the left, to the left, negative infinity is off to the left.”
  • At Christmas, our math class participated in an ugly sweater party. I launched our holiday party by singing the famous Christmas classic, “Have yourself an Arithmetic Sequence.”
  • We are currently working on solving quadratic equations. I had students write their own song for the quadratic formula. First, we sang it to “Pop Goes the Weasel.” Then I played for them the following examples from YouTube.

One Direction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gwz6d9NYz0

Adele: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6hCu0EPs-o

Cup Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYpPa3Jt3-I

Journey: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqU_2y77_eI

Get Low: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzjiW50l4xg

 

  • Next, students wrote and performed their own song about the quadratic formula. There were some great performances. My top two were a group who sang to Eminem, and their song began, “If you know the quadratic formula, please stand up, please stand up.” I also had one group sing to Dean Martin’s That’s Amore

As they were working on a quadratic math lib in class today, I heard many of them humming their songs to remember the formula.

 

If you would like more activities such as this one, please join our mailing list. We send out a weekly engagement activity. Click now to access our active math resource library: https://themathmentors.mykajabi.com/p/email-opt-in-form