Algebraic Proofs + Converting from standard form to slope-intercept form

This week in Algebra 1, we are doing stations. Our stations will involve Algebraic Proofs as well as converting from standard form to slope-intercept form. If you would like a copy of these stations, click here.

Station 1:  Algebraic Proof Envelopes

I’ve type statements and reasons for algebraic proofs. I will cut them apart and place them into an envelope. Students will place the steps/reasons in the appropriate order to complete the proof.

 

Station 2:  Algebraic Proof with Sleeves

Students will fill in the missing steps for proofs. They begin with only reasons missing. Then have steps and reasons. Finally, they have to write an entire proof on their own. They will have to complete the Algebraic proof envelopes first.

 

Station 3:  Bucket of Lies

This is an error analysis station. They will have to identify and correct my errors.

 

Station 4:  SAT Practice 

They will have to complete two practice SAT type questions.

 

Station 5: You Try It 

This is online practice through the website IXL.

 

Station 6: Write It 

This station involves writing in words how to convert from standard form to slope-intercept form.

 

If you would like a copy of these stations, please click here. I will share with you a 30-page pdf. It includes stations, directions and answer keys for each station.

 

What are your favorite activities to incorporate into stations?

 

write a mathography

Math Journal – Write a mathography

write a mathography

Have students write a math a mathography; great icebreaker activity and great for working on growth mindset

 

To begin every school year, I have students write a mathography.  I want to learn thier history with math. When I taught my 105 minute daily Algebra block class, they brought a lot of baggage with them to my room every day. Most of them hated math and had a bad experience with learning it.

I spent time working on changing how they viewed math and their ability to learn it. I begin with these questions in paragraph 1:

Paragraph 1: I would like to know more about your history with math and you as a learner.  

  • Give three adjectives to describe math and explain why you chose them.
  • As you look back at your favorite math lesson, what were you doing?
  • Describe a great math class.
  • Describe a great math teacher.
  • How do you like to learn?
  • Is there anything I should know to help you be successful in this class?

When they were writing the paragraph above, I stressed that I didn’t want them to write what they thought I wanted to hear. If they used words such as hate, boring, etc., I wanted them to explain why those were their adjectives.

I used their back story to change their viewpoint on math. My goal by the end of the year was to make the class their favorite subject!

 

Want more activities to have students up and moving, join our mailing list: 

 

In addition to writing about their history with math, I wanted to learn more about their personal history.

Paragraph 2:  I would like to know more about your family.

  • How many people are in your family?  
  • Do you have any siblings? If yes, how old?
  • Do you have any pets?  If yes, what type and what are their names?
  • What was your favorite family vacation?
  • What are your favorite hobbies?

Paragraph 3:  I would like to know more about your passions.

  • What do you participate in outside of school?
  • What does your family do together for fun?
  • If you could spend time doing anything, what would you choose?

Before they began writing, we created a mapping diagram to help them organize their thoughts. In paragraph 1, we began by generating adjectives about math, then they gave a reason for their thoughts. They used this information to create their sentences for paragraph 1.

I’ve found created graphic organizers helped them write better.

Finally, I had them complete a rubric before they turned in their assignment. I do this with every writing assignment and project. I’ve found I receive higher quality work.

 

Rubric

Began letter with  Dear  Yes No

Paragraph 1:

Addressed each bullet Yes No

Written in complete sentences Yes No

Appropriate grammar/spelling Yes No

 

Paragraph 2:

Addressed each bullet Yes No

Written in complete sentences Yes No

Appropriate grammar/spelling Yes No

 

Paragraph 3:

Addressed each bullet Yes No

Written in complete sentences Yes No

Appropriate grammar/spelling Yes No

 

Each Yes is worth 1 point and each No is worth 0 for a total of 10 points.

 

__________________

Grade out of           /10

 

Grade your paper using the rubric and staple this sheet to the top.