Holiday Math Activities

Holidays are a crazy time in my life both at school and home. I’m busy at every holiday trying to get ready to celebrate with my own family and this is also the time my students decide to be extra WILD and full of energy.

Last year, I decided to capitalize on this extra energy. For every major holiday, we did five activities in math.

A sample of the activities we did last year!

Halloween

  • Domain and Range from graphs – I copied bats, witches, ghosts, and ghouls onto graph paper. Then students found the domain and range.

This year, I have a new activity planned and I’m SUPER excited. I’m calling it, “What’s For Dinner.” I have been saving all of my Costco boxes. I am going to spray paint these boxes black and bedazzle them with cobwebs. Inside, I am going to put in peeled grapes (these will be eyeballs), licorice peels (rat tails), etc. Click the image below for a copy of this activity:

Free Halloween Activity – What’s For dinner

 

Valentine’s Day: 

  • Earn the Points – I had problems on hearts and students had to earn enough points for the day. The more complicated the problem, the more points it was worth.

My favorite Holidays are Thanksgiving and Christmas. We had some GREAT activities for Christmas.

Christmas: 

  • Ugly Sweater Party – We had an ugly sweater party where students performed their rewritten Christmas carol with math. I sang, “Have yourself an arithmetic sequence.” While students performed, we sipped hot cocoa and ate treats that students brought in.

Thanksgiving

  • Thanksgiving Dinner – I purchased some cheap Thanksgiving plates from Walmart. Students had to solve a math problem on potatoes, turkey, sweet potatoes and other holiday favorites. They stapled them to their plates once I had checked them. In the center of their plate, I had them write something they were thankful for.

Want my Halloween Activity, what’s for dinner? Click here.

 

How do you celebrate the holidays in your classroom?

Free Active Math Resource Library

As a teacher, I am always looking for new teaching ideas; however, I don’t have hours and hours to create lessons. We’ve created a collection of free active math activities that can be used with any math content level and are also quick (under 10 minutes) to create!  Access our library by clicking the image below.

 

Cut It Up: This activity is great for a station, warm-up or exit ticket.

Cut it Out

This is a flip book. There is a problem which students open to reveal the answer.

 

Lay It Out: Do you teach a math concept that follows a process? 

If you teach math, the answer to the above question is yes. Lay it out uses notecards to have students look for the pattern in the process. You write out each step on a note card and students place the process in order.

 

Are you feeling Lucky Game? This game could be used with any math concept/topic. Best is that it can be played with any worksheet or problem set from the book. Students solve problems, then place their group name on a number in a spreadsheet. Based on how many problems you think they will complete, you decide on which numbers to use in the spreadsheet.

Do you want directions/videos for the games on I am describing then click here.

 

Envelope Activity: Place students into groups of 3 or 4. Write a math problem on the outside of the envelope. Inside the envelope place paper or graphs for them to complete the problem. Students will take a paper out of the envelope, work out the problem and put their solution back in the envelope. They rotate their envelopes clockwise, take out a sheet of paper, solve the new problem and place their solution back in the envelope. They continue this process until they have their initial envelope back. Once they have their original envelope, they take out all of the papers and check everyone’s solution. If there are any that are different, they discuss the error as a group. This is great for error analysis and the math practice involving critiquing the reasoning of others.

 

Bucket of Lies: Solve math problems incorrectly, make copies of your work and place them into a bucket. Have students work in groups of 2-4. They will take out a problem, find the error and discuss how to correct it. This is an activity that you could do with every chapter. Use the errors you are seeing on formative assessments to help them prepare for their summative.

 

Do you want access to our entire library? Click the image below: 

 

 

 

 

Algebraic Proofs + Converting from standard form to slope-intercept form

This week in Algebra 1, we are doing stations. Our stations will involve Algebraic Proofs as well as converting from standard form to slope-intercept form. If you would like a copy of these stations, click here.

Station 1:  Algebraic Proof Envelopes

I’ve type statements and reasons for algebraic proofs. I will cut them apart and place them into an envelope. Students will place the steps/reasons in the appropriate order to complete the proof.

 

Station 2:  Algebraic Proof with Sleeves

Students will fill in the missing steps for proofs. They begin with only reasons missing. Then have steps and reasons. Finally, they have to write an entire proof on their own. They will have to complete the Algebraic proof envelopes first.

 

Station 3:  Bucket of Lies

This is an error analysis station. They will have to identify and correct my errors.

 

Station 4:  SAT Practice 

They will have to complete two practice SAT type questions.

 

Station 5: You Try It 

This is online practice through the website IXL.

 

Station 6: Write It 

This station involves writing in words how to convert from standard form to slope-intercept form.

 

If you would like a copy of these stations, please click here. I will share with you a 30-page pdf. It includes stations, directions and answer keys for each station.

 

What are your favorite activities to incorporate into stations?